CLIPPING

We provide a quality and professional clipping service. We are more than happy to advise of you the best clip for your horse if you are unsure. Everyone loves to clip a 'quiet horse', however we all know that this isn't always the case.. If you have a young, nervous or just a very unsure horse, we will take all of the time necessary to introduce your horse to the clippers with a very calm and reassuring attitude. So that they will have a good experience to take forward with them for any future clips. We would appreciate any background information regarding any issues that they may have. If your horse needs to be sedated, we are more than happy to clip under sedation (the relevant paperwork will need signing for approval from yourselves). Also if they need sedation from the vet, this is something that you will need to approve and pay for.

 

CHOOSING THE RIGHT CLIP

 

 

There are many factors to be weighed as part of this decision: Do you work your horse in cold weather? Does your horse sweat when you work him in cold weather? Are you willing to blanket your horse? Does your horse live outside all winter? Clipping is a choice that should be made based on your specific situation. Generally, if you do not work your horse during the winter, there is little need to clip; but if your horse sweats in cold, then clipping is a good option to prevent chill and decrease drying time. Clipping can be important if it is hard to dry your horse after a workout, because sweat makes his coat heavy and prevents it from keeping him warm. When dry, your horse's coat is his natural defense against the elements; therefore if you decide to clip you should be prepared to use blankets. This article will cover how to prepare for clipping, clipping style options, and aftercare.

The entire body is clipped, including the face, legs and belly. This clip is appropriate for horses in heavy work during the winter and who will be turned out in dry areas. Blanketing, and possibly a neck cover, will be necessary, and riding with a quarter sheet in cold temperatures is advised.

The body and face are clipped, but the legs and saddle area are left unclipped. Determine the saddle area by tracing a saddle pad with chalk on your horse's back, leave this area unclipped. This clip is appropriate for horses in medium to heavy work. Blanketing will be necessary, and riding with a quarter sheet in cold temperatures is advised.

The body and face are clipped, but the legs and area that a quarter sheet would cover are left unclipped. Determine the blanket area by tracing a quarter sheet with chalk on your horse's back, then leave this area unclipped. This clip is appropriate for horses in medium work. Blanketing will be necessary.

The underside of the neck, chest, belly and halfway up the sides and hind end are clipped. High trace clips are also popular — this simply means the clip is higher on the neck, sides and hind end. This clip is appropriate for horses in light to medium work, blanketing will be necessary.

The underside of the neck, chest and belly are clipped. A Strip clip simply means the Bib clip is extended further under the flank. These clips leave the most hair on your horse and are appropriate for horses in light work. Some blanketing will be necessary depending on the climate in your area.

The underside of the neck, chest, and belly are clipped; the upper clip line sweeps diagonally from the upper jaw line to under the flank. This clip is appropriate for horses in light to medium work. Blanketing will be necessary to protect the chest, but they can be lighter than required for horses with more drastic clips.

With many clipping styles to choose from, the choice you make should once again be based on your particular situation. A full body clip can be an option for horses in heavy work and limited turnout, but other clips allow you to preserve some of the insulation a winter coat provides while uncovering areas prone to the most sweat. Choose the style that best fits your horse's work level, your riding discipline, as well as how much and where your horse sweats. The chart below illustrates some common clips (blue areas are clipped, gray areas stay unclipped